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Sustainable Training

Importance of Healthy & Injury Resistant Shoulders

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Importance of Healthy & Injury Resistant Shoulders

Shoulder health is one of the top priorities in our ID strength and mobility programmes and building a strong and stable shoulder is essential to structural balance for posture and performance.

One of the most common injuries functional fitness athletes experience is a shoulder injury. Great demands of shoulder strength and mobility are often required to effectively and safely perform movements like pull-ups, muscle-ups, handstand, snatch, cleans, jerks, push-ups, bench press, and more.

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Lower Back Pain Lifting Weights

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Lower Back Pain Lifting Weights

At some point in life, we all suffer from back pain.  For many, it is only a short term problem. But for some, it can be a crippling ongoing issue.

Lower back pain is a growing health problem worldwide affecting people of all ages and backgrounds. Back pain is the single leading cause of disability, preventing many people from engaging in work as well as other everyday activities. Experts estimate that up to 80% of the population will experience back pain at some time in their lives. Lower back pain can be categorised as acute, sub-acute, or chronic. Several risk factors have been associated with it such as occupational posture, obesity, depression, sleep, breathing abnormalities and the list continues. What is important to bear in mind is given these facts it is likely that the spine will be at a greater risk of injury within the training room if it shows movement limitations which is generally the problematic area for the majority.

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Mitochondria, Magnesium & Oxidative Capacity

Mitochondria, Magnesium & Oxidative Capacity

High-intensity exercise can results in an increase of mitochondria if supported by the diet.  In order to make new mitochondria the body needs Mg as a co-factor.  If your Mg levels are low, you are going to have a difficult time benefiting for the high-intensity training and increasing your total mitochondria count.  If your goals are to improve your fitness levels you need to seriously be looking at your diet.

Energy Systems: PART 5: Aerobic Kerbs Cycle Metabolic flexibility

Energy Systems: PART 5: Aerobic Kerbs Cycle Metabolic flexibility

Both protein and fat CAN NOT be turned into energy without oxygen.  Non endurance athletes must recognise that the energy demands place on the body are most efficiently fuels by carbohydrates.  If your training goals include building strength, explosive power, high intensity intervals, circuit training, or interval based sports (most team sports), your diet needs to include quality carbohydrates.  Endurance  based sports (marathons, triathlons, adventure racing, cycling, etc…) do not require as many carbohydrates because the low level of energy demands can be sustainable fuelled by fatty acid oxidation if correctly trained.  

Team Sustain: French Contrast Method

Team Sustain: French Contrast Method

“Athletic performance isn’t about who is stronger, although most coaches incorrecly belive this to be the case. The key to improvd sport performance is producing more force in less time. The results when an athlete can absorb more force eccentrically, allowing him, in turn, to apply higher levels of force concentrically in less time. In other words, the athlete who can narrow the “V” (see graph below) wins every time.”

Sustainable Handstands - Beginners Workshop

Sustainable Handstands - Beginners Workshop

Would you like to learn how to handstand? Are you new to handstands or struggling to find you alignment and balance? Are you looking to progress your handstand training? TSTM has just the workshop for you.

Energy Systems: PART 4: Introduction to Aerobic Pathways

Energy Systems: PART 4: Introduction to Aerobic Pathways

The aerobic energy metabolism requires the presence of oxygen and glycogen (carbohydrates) or fatty acids.  Although the aerobic system is the least powerful of the three, it can function all day literally and can alternate between stored fat, carbohydrate and protein to produce energy (ATP). The higher and athletes level of aerobic fitness the faster and more effectively they will recover between sets of heavy lifts or sprint intervals because the aerobic energy system drives the recovery of the anaerobic energy pathways.   Let's say this one more time; aerobic fitness is essential for ALL athletes, not just endurance based sports.

Energy Systems: PART 3 Anaerobic (Lactic - Glycolytic)

Energy Systems: PART 3 Anaerobic (Lactic - Glycolytic)

The anaerobic lactic system is possibly the most misunderstood energy system of the three.  Most coaches associate the anaerobic lactic energy system with high levels of fatigue and lactate production, which is a byproduct of the anaerobic lactic system. Continued anaerobic metabolism will lead to fatigue due to the large changes in the cellular environment that impairs energy production and muscle contractibility, but this is not the only contributing factor and simply training an athlete to fatigue doesn't train the anaerobic lactic system to improve. The cause of fatigue for heavy, explosive lifting will be significantly different from the marathon runners fatigue.  Fatigue never has a single cause.

Energy Systems: PART 2 Alactic Phosphocreatine

Energy Systems: PART 2 Alactic Phosphocreatine

The ATP-PC system has the highest power output of the three energy systems but typically lasts for only 10-15seconds. It is anaerobic because it doesn't require oxygen to function. The ATP-PC system is responsible for providing energy to the highest threshold muscle fibres that are capable of producing the most force. It makes sense that bigger stronger muscles generate more power due to their storage capacity for phosphocreatine. The ATP-PC system is the most genetic and the least adaptable of the energy systems.